In which I consider a move across the country and plead for some unbiased insight

by Marian Schembari on February 19, 2010


I’m pretty sure (about 97%) that I’m moving to Portland. Oregon.

As in, not New York.

Which makes both parents want to murder me (if only to keep me here I suppose). Doesn’t matter that I lived abroad for a year and saw them a grand total of 3 times. No, apparently there aren’t as many “opportunities” in the Pacific Northwest. Wtf?

Here’s the thing: I’ve always assumed I would “end up” in New York. I mean, it’s New-effing-York. The Big Apple/city that never sleeps/land of good and plenty, blady blah blah blah. Maybe it’s because I grew up in an NYC suburb or because all the women in my family are crazy successful awesome ladies and New York is apparently the place to be if you’re going to be an independent woman with a snazzy career and briefcase to match.

U.S.A. vs Everywhere Else

I’ve seen more of the world than the United States. While I was living abroad in 2007 and 2008 I realized this weird and crazy fact, that is also mildly depressing. How could I not know anything about my own country? My globetrotter parents were adamant their kids would see the world and we totes went on road trips in big cars with fold down seats. I hated them (the road trips, not the seats. The seats were cool). Meaning that my memories of Yellowstone and the Southeast and Canada are not my fondest – apparently I have sleep tourettes. But only when I sleep in a tent with 5 other people, three of whom are smelly boys. I really wish I was kidding.

With that in mind, I thought the world revolved around New York. Both my parents (who I love and adore and ardently respect) worked here at big important jobs meeting big important people. New York was really my first experience with a big city. Then I moved to London and fell head over hells in love. A year later and I vacationed with my bestest friends in San Diego and fell in love again. And I’m starting to realize I don’t actually like New York, never mind love.

Things I Will Not Miss and Things I Currently Do

I miss nature and greenery not confined to a park. I’d be more than happy to get rid of the crowded streets, noise, the smell of urine, the smell of “meat”, dirty/run-down/rat-infested public transportation, scowls, feeling like a bitch all the time, being surrounded by bitches all the time and did I mention noise? I know I can’t do country living as I get bored quite easily but I need a city that’s a little more hippy and outdoorsy than the Big A. New York does indeed have everything and I know there are groups here that drive up to the Catskills but I need it to not be such a trek. I need something slower. Let’s brash and painfully obvious (i.e. pretentious).

Over the past six months I’ve learned to seriously rely on myself and trust my instincts but I’m nevertheless letting the doubts of my parents influence how I think. Will moving out of the Center of the Universe ruin all my hard work? Can I handle leaving all of my greatest and oldest friends and start off brand-spanking new? Can I even afford a move across the country?

Can I Do It Anywhere?

The beauty of freelance and social media work is that you can do it in New York or in a tiny cellar at a farmhouse about 10 miles south of Tikrit. It can’t be that difficult to find clients in Portland, right?

I interviewed Jane Friedman (based in Ohio) for a Digital Book World post and wrote: “She says her Midwestern location makes her feel a little removed and makes it much harder to keep up with the rapid changes happening in the industry. On the other hand, that distance also gives her a great perspective which, coupled with the job itself, means she’s not biased about which direction publishing goes in.”

So as of right now the plan is to head over there in March or April to scope the place out. Meet with people in publishing and social media, check out the bakeries, maybe tour a culinary school… If I love it, then hopefully I’ll be able to move out there in 2011. We’ll just have to see. If anyone has any advice, knows people in Oregon and/or has done something similar, pleasepleaseplease, advise away.

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  • http://twitter.com/marianschembari/status/9352102300 Marian Schembari

    In which I consider a move across the country and plead for some unbiased insight http://bit.ly/9x47as

  • Paul Snyder

    I wholeheartedly support the move. In 2005 I left my unsold condominium in Atlanta for a meagerly-paying job as a booking agent in a one-woman ‘shop’ in Seattle. Our clients were ultra-niche (bluegrass and old time string bands, etc.). The pay was small, and, a scant six months later I found myself driving an identical 15′ Penske moving van back across the country and moving back into my still-unsold condominium.

    One month after that inglorious return I was back in PR, which was fine. But the experience’s lesson I remember and value most was this. I did something I really wanted to do, the work (albeit only six months worth) was incredibly rewarding, and I got to say I lived in Seattle.

    Not that New York is blessed with fantastic weather, but do beware. Grey drizzly days outnumber days of sunshine by a horrific margin and I’ve heard that Portland has the highest suicide rate in the country.

    But that for which you think you want or need from a place to live, you could do much worse. And there’s the benefit of the satisfaction that so many explorers experience. “Hey, I did it, even if I turned back before the summit, I did it.”

    For what it’s worth,
    Paul

  • Paul Snyder

    I wholeheartedly support the move. In 2005 I left my unsold condominium in Atlanta for a meagerly-paying job as a booking agent in a one-woman ‘shop’ in Seattle. Our clients were ultra-niche (bluegrass and old time string bands, etc.). The pay was small, and, a scant six months later I found myself driving an identical 15′ Penske moving van back across the country and moving back into my still-unsold condominium.

    One month after that inglorious return I was back in PR, which was fine. But the experience’s lesson I remember and value most was this. I did something I really wanted to do, the work (albeit only six months worth) was incredibly rewarding, and I got to say I lived in Seattle.

    Not that New York is blessed with fantastic weather, but do beware. Grey drizzly days outnumber days of sunshine by a horrific margin and I’ve heard that Portland has the highest suicide rate in the country.

    But that for which you think you want or need from a place to live, you could do much worse. And there’s the benefit of the satisfaction that so many explorers experience. “Hey, I did it, even if I turned back before the summit, I did it.”

    For what it’s worth,
    Paul

    • admin

      Excellent advice, Paul. I’m cool with the rain (lived in London for a year – made me totally depressed but I also love the rain), but not so much with suicide.

      I feel like at 22 I should be doing shit like moving across the country and not knowing what I want to do with my life. And if I come back 6 months later? No biggie.

    • admin

      Excellent advice, Paul. I’m cool with the rain (lived in London for a year – made me totally depressed but I also love the rain), but not so much with suicide.

      I feel like at 22 I should be doing shit like moving across the country and not knowing what I want to do with my life. And if I come back 6 months later? No biggie.

  • Paul Snyder

    I wholeheartedly support the move. In 2005 I left my unsold condominium in Atlanta for a meagerly-paying job as a booking agent in a one-woman ‘shop’ in Seattle. Our clients were ultra-niche (bluegrass and old time string bands, etc.). The pay was small, and, a scant six months later I found myself driving an identical 15′ Penske moving van back across the country and moving back into my still-unsold condominium.

    One month after that inglorious return I was back in PR, which was fine. But the experience’s lesson I remember and value most was this. I did something I really wanted to do, the work (albeit only six months worth) was incredibly rewarding, and I got to say I lived in Seattle.

    Not that New York is blessed with fantastic weather, but do beware. Grey drizzly days outnumber days of sunshine by a horrific margin and I’ve heard that Portland has the highest suicide rate in the country.

    But that for which you think you want or need from a place to live, you could do much worse. And there’s the benefit of the satisfaction that so many explorers experience. “Hey, I did it, even if I turned back before the summit, I did it.”

    For what it’s worth,
    Paul

    • admin

      Excellent advice, Paul. I’m cool with the rain (lived in London for a year – made me totally depressed but I also love the rain), but not so much with suicide.

      I feel like at 22 I should be doing shit like moving across the country and not knowing what I want to do with my life. And if I come back 6 months later? No biggie.

  • SL

    Although Portland does not quite = San Francisco, this article is great, and will tell you everything you need to know about moving to the West Coast: http://therumpus.net/2010/02/funny-women-15-how-to-move-to-san-francisco/

  • SL

    Although Portland does not quite = San Francisco, this article is great, and will tell you everything you need to know about moving to the West Coast: http://therumpus.net/2010/02/funny-women-15-how-to-move-to-san-francisco/

  • SL

    Although Portland does not quite = San Francisco, this article is great, and will tell you everything you need to know about moving to the West Coast: http://therumpus.net/2010/02/funny-women-15-how-to-move-to-san-francisco/

  • Gaby Vargas

    Hi Marian,
    Im definitely with ya on the moving to Oregon. Sometimes, you need to make some sacrifices in order to grow as a person and when I saw what you wrote, it was me back in 2003 whenever I decided to come with my limited English to the US, 19 year old , just graduated from College and with no idea where to start.

    It was a long way and many many difficulties along the road but I found my dream job and I can tell you, it was so worth it to be away from home for so long. I miss my parents so much but then again I wanted to find ME and I did, I dont think I would have had that if I would have stayed in Peru. I have learned so much from my crazy trip and definitely earned the experiences I needed in order to reach my goals.

    I have been in Oregon many times, wonderful city , very relaxing and has a lot of places where you can just drive all by yourself and feel so connected with nature. I will look up the info I got from over there and pass that to you. I met very nice open minded folks that made me like the city even more. I actually like Oregon better than San Francisco.

    Take care and good luck in your new journey. I love the way you write things, it sounds just like you. Im glad that my english has improved a bit so at least I can send you a nice message that makes sense!
    Love you sweetie,
    Gaby

    • admin

      Thank you so much for the wonderful response Gaby!

  • Gaby Vargas

    Hi Marian,
    Im definitely with ya on the moving to Oregon. Sometimes, you need to make some sacrifices in order to grow as a person and when I saw what you wrote, it was me back in 2003 whenever I decided to come with my limited English to the US, 19 year old , just graduated from College and with no idea where to start.

    It was a long way and many many difficulties along the road but I found my dream job and I can tell you, it was so worth it to be away from home for so long. I miss my parents so much but then again I wanted to find ME and I did, I dont think I would have had that if I would have stayed in Peru. I have learned so much from my crazy trip and definitely earned the experiences I needed in order to reach my goals.

    I have been in Oregon many times, wonderful city , very relaxing and has a lot of places where you can just drive all by yourself and feel so connected with nature. I will look up the info I got from over there and pass that to you. I met very nice open minded folks that made me like the city even more. I actually like Oregon better than San Francisco.

    Take care and good luck in your new journey. I love the way you write things, it sounds just like you. Im glad that my english has improved a bit so at least I can send you a nice message that makes sense!
    Love you sweetie,
    Gaby

  • Gaby Vargas

    Hi Marian,
    Im definitely with ya on the moving to Oregon. Sometimes, you need to make some sacrifices in order to grow as a person and when I saw what you wrote, it was me back in 2003 whenever I decided to come with my limited English to the US, 19 year old , just graduated from College and with no idea where to start.

    It was a long way and many many difficulties along the road but I found my dream job and I can tell you, it was so worth it to be away from home for so long. I miss my parents so much but then again I wanted to find ME and I did, I dont think I would have had that if I would have stayed in Peru. I have learned so much from my crazy trip and definitely earned the experiences I needed in order to reach my goals.

    I have been in Oregon many times, wonderful city , very relaxing and has a lot of places where you can just drive all by yourself and feel so connected with nature. I will look up the info I got from over there and pass that to you. I met very nice open minded folks that made me like the city even more. I actually like Oregon better than San Francisco.

    Take care and good luck in your new journey. I love the way you write things, it sounds just like you. Im glad that my english has improved a bit so at least I can send you a nice message that makes sense!
    Love you sweetie,
    Gaby

    • admin

      Thank you so much for the wonderful response Gaby!

  • Kaylin

    So my boyfriend lives in Olympia Wa. (two hoursish away) and the weather is about the same between the two places. Protland is actualyl a pretty cool town – lots to do, lots of live music, tons and tons of outdorrsy stuff to do. There are a bunch of vinyards in the area, and the skiing is pretty great. However, be ready for rain like you’ve never known, bitter cold and driving restrictions varying on the season (roads wash out or snow over, etc). Buy a raincoat and get ready to meet a lot of very different people…it’ll be a bit of a culture shock.

  • Kaylin

    So my boyfriend lives in Olympia Wa. (two hoursish away) and the weather is about the same between the two places. Protland is actualyl a pretty cool town – lots to do, lots of live music, tons and tons of outdorrsy stuff to do. There are a bunch of vinyards in the area, and the skiing is pretty great. However, be ready for rain like you’ve never known, bitter cold and driving restrictions varying on the season (roads wash out or snow over, etc). Buy a raincoat and get ready to meet a lot of very different people…it’ll be a bit of a culture shock.

  • Kaylin

    So my boyfriend lives in Olympia Wa. (two hoursish away) and the weather is about the same between the two places. Protland is actualyl a pretty cool town – lots to do, lots of live music, tons and tons of outdorrsy stuff to do. There are a bunch of vinyards in the area, and the skiing is pretty great. However, be ready for rain like you’ve never known, bitter cold and driving restrictions varying on the season (roads wash out or snow over, etc). Buy a raincoat and get ready to meet a lot of very different people…it’ll be a bit of a culture shock.

  • ginni

    way to go lady. i can totally relate to the somehow-we-all-believed-new-york-is-our-mecca thing. and the bit about parents having this unspeakable power over our decisions, even when we’re totally supposed to be, like, “adults.” it’s really quite infuriating actually.

    i say go for it. if you’re unhappy, new york will still be new york. you can always move back or move somewhere else.

    spread your wings young marian! you’re golden!

    smiles.

  • ginni

    way to go lady. i can totally relate to the somehow-we-all-believed-new-york-is-our-mecca thing. and the bit about parents having this unspeakable power over our decisions, even when we’re totally supposed to be, like, “adults.” it’s really quite infuriating actually.

    i say go for it. if you’re unhappy, new york will still be new york. you can always move back or move somewhere else.

    spread your wings young marian! you’re golden!

    smiles.

  • http://michellerafter.com/ Michelle Rafter

    Come to Portland, you’ll love it. As I tweeted earlier today, there’s a clan of indie journalists here that’s steadily growing, many working on the digital frontier, with lots of formal and informal gatherings on a regular basis. Check out Digital Journalism Portland for details on one such group. Beer and Blog is another. Check out Oregon Media Central, a blog, or RedoingMedia, a new weekly radio program, for more on what’s happening here. For a reality check, check in with folks like Bill Lascher, who recently moved here from LA (his blog is Lascher at Large). The journo scene spills into the tech scene, which spills into the social media scene and there’s lots going on in all of them.

    As someone who grew up here, moved away for a long time, and recently moved back, I can say that there’s a major NYC-PDX connection, with many people born and raised here leaving for the East Coast only to come back eventually, or East Coast transplants who come here and never leave. Not sure why, Portland definitely isn’t as big or cosmopolitan as NYC. But if it’s less traffic, less hassle and more space you’re looking for, you’ll find it here. And you definitely don’t have to go far for those outdoor spaces you’re craving – Forest Park puts Central Park to shame (sacrilege I know, but it’s true), and the mountains and ocean are an hour in either direction. When you need a big-city fix, Seattle’s 3 hours north by car or train and the Bay Area’s an hour by plane.

    Keep tweeting about your trip & I’m sure you’ll catch the attention of other writers here. Start following some of our PDX writer lists too as a way to start to get to know people.

    Michelle Rafter
    WordCount: Freelancing in the Digital Age

    • admin

      This is some amaazing advice, Michelle. Thank you so much!

  • http://jargonwriter.wordpress.com/ Melissa Breau

    Good luck. I’m currently working at a magazine here in NY but will likely be moving in about 2 years and am wondering a lot of the same questions myself – though I’m probably looking at San Diego or South Carolina (Charleston).

    Keep us updated.

  • http://michellerafter.com/ Michelle Rafter

    Come to Portland, you’ll love it. As I tweeted earlier today, there’s a clan of indie journalists here that’s steadily growing, many working on the digital frontier, with lots of formal and informal gatherings on a regular basis. Check out Digital Journalism Portland for details on one such group. Beer and Blog is another. Check out Oregon Media Central, a blog, or RedoingMedia, a new weekly radio program, for more on what’s happening here. For a reality check, check in with folks like Bill Lascher, who recently moved here from LA (his blog is Lascher at Large). The journo scene spills into the tech scene, which spills into the social media scene and there’s lots going on in all of them.

    As someone who grew up here, moved away for a long time, and recently moved back, I can say that there’s a major NYC-PDX connection, with many people born and raised here leaving for the East Coast only to come back eventually, or East Coast transplants who come here and never leave. Not sure why, Portland definitely isn’t as big or cosmopolitan as NYC. But if it’s less traffic, less hassle and more space you’re looking for, you’ll find it here. And you definitely don’t have to go far for those outdoor spaces you’re craving – Forest Park puts Central Park to shame (sacrilege I know, but it’s true), and the mountains and ocean are an hour in either direction. When you need a big-city fix, Seattle’s 3 hours north by car or train and the Bay Area’s an hour by plane.

    Keep tweeting about your trip & I’m sure you’ll catch the attention of other writers here. Start following some of our PDX writer lists too as a way to start to get to know people.

    Michelle Rafter
    WordCount: Freelancing in the Digital Age

    • admin

      This is some amaazing advice, Michelle. Thank you so much!

    • admin

      This is some amaazing advice, Michelle. Thank you so much!

  • http://twitter.com/pete_kistler/status/9375806770 Pete Kistler

    @marianschembari: In which I consider a move across the country and plead for some unbiased insight http://bit.ly/ahBcFt

  • http://jargonwriter.wordpress.com/ Melissa Breau

    Good luck. I’m currently working at a magazine here in NY but will likely be moving in about 2 years and am wondering a lot of the same questions myself – though I’m probably looking at San Diego or South Carolina (Charleston).

    Keep us updated.

  • http://jargonwriter.wordpress.com/ Melissa Breau

    Good luck. I’m currently working at a magazine here in NY but will likely be moving in about 2 years and am wondering a lot of the same questions myself – though I’m probably looking at San Diego or South Carolina (Charleston).

    Keep us updated.

  • http://carolinebookbinder.blogspot.com/ Carin

    well 5 years after college I moved away from TN… to NYC. And 5 years after that, I moved to NC. Moving is expensive, complicated, and starting over can be tough (no friends, no job). BUT it’s always perfectly do-able, and also it’s reversible if it doesn’t work out. Personally, I found the rain in NYC pretty unrelenting at times, and although it might sound shocking to you now I will say that an occasional stint at a tanning bed can do wonders for your mood and Vitamin D. Parents will always freak out no matter what. They are the last people you should listen to on advice about this sort of thing as their advice will never be about you – it’ll be about THEM. They’ll get over it. Go for it. And good luck!

  • http://carolinebookbinder.blogspot.com/ Carin

    well 5 years after college I moved away from TN… to NYC. And 5 years after that, I moved to NC. Moving is expensive, complicated, and starting over can be tough (no friends, no job). BUT it’s always perfectly do-able, and also it’s reversible if it doesn’t work out. Personally, I found the rain in NYC pretty unrelenting at times, and although it might sound shocking to you now I will say that an occasional stint at a tanning bed can do wonders for your mood and Vitamin D. Parents will always freak out no matter what. They are the last people you should listen to on advice about this sort of thing as their advice will never be about you – it’ll be about THEM. They’ll get over it. Go for it. And good luck!

  • http://carolinebookbinder.blogspot.com/ Carin

    well 5 years after college I moved away from TN… to NYC. And 5 years after that, I moved to NC. Moving is expensive, complicated, and starting over can be tough (no friends, no job). BUT it’s always perfectly do-able, and also it’s reversible if it doesn’t work out. Personally, I found the rain in NYC pretty unrelenting at times, and although it might sound shocking to you now I will say that an occasional stint at a tanning bed can do wonders for your mood and Vitamin D. Parents will always freak out no matter what. They are the last people you should listen to on advice about this sort of thing as their advice will never be about you – it’ll be about THEM. They’ll get over it. Go for it. And good luck!

  • Brittany

    Sounds like a great change. I am from Portland but currently living in Seattle for school. Portland is a breath of fresh air, and there are so many unique areas to explore. The people of Portland are just low key and it doesn’t seem like there is ever much to worry about. Feeling like a bitch isn’t something that Portlanders have to worry about on a daily basis. It’s just relaxed and fun. I hope you have a great time visiting, and that you take advantage of all the city has to offer.

  • Brittany

    Sounds like a great change. I am from Portland but currently living in Seattle for school. Portland is a breath of fresh air, and there are so many unique areas to explore. The people of Portland are just low key and it doesn’t seem like there is ever much to worry about. Feeling like a bitch isn’t something that Portlanders have to worry about on a daily basis. It’s just relaxed and fun. I hope you have a great time visiting, and that you take advantage of all the city has to offer.

  • Brittany

    Sounds like a great change. I am from Portland but currently living in Seattle for school. Portland is a breath of fresh air, and there are so many unique areas to explore. The people of Portland are just low key and it doesn’t seem like there is ever much to worry about. Feeling like a bitch isn’t something that Portlanders have to worry about on a daily basis. It’s just relaxed and fun. I hope you have a great time visiting, and that you take advantage of all the city has to offer.

  • http://stacyboyd.wordpress.com/ Stacy Boyd

    If a move is calling you, do it.

    I moved from GA to NYC after college. My entire family has always been, and still is, in GA (parents, sisters, aunts, uncles, etc.) They thought I was crazy. Honestly, once I got to NYC, *I* thought I was crazy. I hated the place for years, but stayed for jobs and that one moment out of 20 when I loved the city. I always thought I would move out of NYC eventually–to NC or CA or San Francisco–but then I moved out of Manhattan to…Brooklyn. (Kensington, specifically.) The quiet, the tree-lined streets, the ability to bike to Prospect Park, the nice people…it changed my entire perspective. Suddenly, I had an oasis from the noise and smell, and I’m not sure I will ever leave. (Though I do love San Francisco and the north GA mountains–but that’s what travel is for.)

    The experience of picking up and starting over is worth it, even if you don’t stay. Culture shock is good for you.

  • http://www.christinenegroni.com/ Christine Negroni

    I don’t think you’re crazy. Do it. Just make sure you write about it too. But there’s little doubt you’ll do that is there?

  • http://www.christinenegroni.com/ Christine Negroni

    I don’t think you’re crazy. Do it. Just make sure you write about it too. But there’s little doubt you’ll do that is there?

  • http://www.christinenegroni.com Christine Negroni

    I don’t think you’re crazy. Do it. Just make sure you write about it too. But there’s little doubt you’ll do that is there?

  • http://stacyboyd.wordpress.com/ Stacy Boyd

    If a move is calling you, do it.

    I moved from GA to NYC after college. My entire family has always been, and still is, in GA (parents, sisters, aunts, uncles, etc.) They thought I was crazy. Honestly, once I got to NYC, *I* thought I was crazy. I hated the place for years, but stayed for jobs and that one moment out of 20 when I loved the city. I always thought I would move out of NYC eventually–to NC or CA or San Francisco–but then I moved out of Manhattan to…Brooklyn. (Kensington, specifically.) The quiet, the tree-lined streets, the ability to bike to Prospect Park, the nice people…it changed my entire perspective. Suddenly, I had an oasis from the noise and smell, and I’m not sure I will ever leave. (Though I do love San Francisco and the north GA mountains–but that’s what travel is for.)

    The experience of picking up and starting over is worth it, even if you don’t stay. Culture shock is good for you.

  • http://stacyboyd.wordpress.com/ Stacy Boyd

    If a move is calling you, do it.

    I moved from GA to NYC after college. My entire family has always been, and still is, in GA (parents, sisters, aunts, uncles, etc.) They thought I was crazy. Honestly, once I got to NYC, *I* thought I was crazy. I hated the place for years, but stayed for jobs and that one moment out of 20 when I loved the city. I always thought I would move out of NYC eventually–to NC or CA or San Francisco–but then I moved out of Manhattan to…Brooklyn. (Kensington, specifically.) The quiet, the tree-lined streets, the ability to bike to Prospect Park, the nice people…it changed my entire perspective. Suddenly, I had an oasis from the noise and smell, and I’m not sure I will ever leave. (Though I do love San Francisco and the north GA mountains–but that’s what travel is for.)

    The experience of picking up and starting over is worth it, even if you don’t stay. Culture shock is good for you.

  • http://klrliterary.com/ Kirsten Ringer

    Everyone’s advice here is great, and I agree wholeheartedly: MOVE! If only to experience other parts of our great country. Like Carin wrote, you can always move back.

    I grew up in Illinois, went to school in Alabama, moved to Los Angeles for 6 years, then headed to NYC where I’ve been for 10 years. The experiences I’ve had in all these vastly different areas are priceless. And, while NYC is a fabulous city, it isn’t the Center of the Universe (sorry New Yorkers!). Just ask anyone that’s not in NYC!

    Can’t wait to read more about your decision, Marian! Good luck!

  • http://klrliterary.com/ Kirsten Ringer

    Everyone’s advice here is great, and I agree wholeheartedly: MOVE! If only to experience other parts of our great country. Like Carin wrote, you can always move back.

    I grew up in Illinois, went to school in Alabama, moved to Los Angeles for 6 years, then headed to NYC where I’ve been for 10 years. The experiences I’ve had in all these vastly different areas are priceless. And, while NYC is a fabulous city, it isn’t the Center of the Universe (sorry New Yorkers!). Just ask anyone that’s not in NYC!

    Can’t wait to read more about your decision, Marian! Good luck!

  • http://klrliterary.com Kirsten Ringer

    Everyone’s advice here is great, and I agree wholeheartedly: MOVE! If only to experience other parts of our great country. Like Carin wrote, you can always move back.

    I grew up in Illinois, went to school in Alabama, moved to Los Angeles for 6 years, then headed to NYC where I’ve been for 10 years. The experiences I’ve had in all these vastly different areas are priceless. And, while NYC is a fabulous city, it isn’t the Center of the Universe (sorry New Yorkers!). Just ask anyone that’s not in NYC!

    Can’t wait to read more about your decision, Marian! Good luck!

  • Kelsey

    NO! But I’m biased…

  • Kelsey

    NO! But I’m biased…

  • Kelsey

    NO! But I’m biased…

  • Lauren

    Hey Marian! Long time no talk! I love reading your blog and just had to comment on this post to give my own (biased) opinion. I have a deep fondness for the Pacific NW after going to school in WA, and I think you’ll love it there! I’ve only been to Portland once but I really enjoyed myself. Seems like an awesome city and I wish I had taken the trip more often. Portland microbreweries also make some damn good beer. If the rain and cold get to you, you can always come visit Hawaii! :D

  • Lauren

    Hey Marian! Long time no talk! I love reading your blog and just had to comment on this post to give my own (biased) opinion. I have a deep fondness for the Pacific NW after going to school in WA, and I think you’ll love it there! I’ve only been to Portland once but I really enjoyed myself. Seems like an awesome city and I wish I had taken the trip more often. Portland microbreweries also make some damn good beer. If the rain and cold get to you, you can always come visit Hawaii! :D

  • http://talkingshrimp.com/blog/ Laura Belgray

    Hey new friend Marian! I have two questions:

    1) Why are bloggy/internetty people so drawn to Portland? I’ve only been once and all I remember is there’s a good pie place. Maybe the pie place gets free wifi.

    2) By sleep tourettes, do you mean you fall asleep uncontrollably, at odd times? Or do you mean you shout colorful epithets in your sleep?

    Very excited to find your blog.

    • admin

      I’m pretty sure we both commented on each other’s blogs at the same time. Need I remind you it’s almost 2am? That means bedtime missy. We also both listed our comments as numbers. Two numbers to be exact. Look at my comment and you shall find that I did indeed mention we are twins. Exhbit A my friend, Exhibit A.

      To address your (2) points:

      1. I don’t know, but if there was a good pie place with free wifi I would move to Canada. C-A-N-A-D-A.

      2. Sleep Tourettes = I shout profanities at my little brothers whilst sleeping.

      Very excited to find YOUR blog!

  • http://talkingshrimp.com/blog/ Laura Belgray

    Hey new friend Marian! I have two questions:

    1) Why are bloggy/internetty people so drawn to Portland? I’ve only been once and all I remember is there’s a good pie place. Maybe the pie place gets free wifi.

    2) By sleep tourettes, do you mean you fall asleep uncontrollably, at odd times? Or do you mean you shout colorful epithets in your sleep?

    Very excited to find your blog.

    • admin

      I’m pretty sure we both commented on each other’s blogs at the same time. Need I remind you it’s almost 2am? That means bedtime missy. We also both listed our comments as numbers. Two numbers to be exact. Look at my comment and you shall find that I did indeed mention we are twins. Exhbit A my friend, Exhibit A.

      To address your (2) points:

      1. I don’t know, but if there was a good pie place with free wifi I would move to Canada. C-A-N-A-D-A.

      2. Sleep Tourettes = I shout profanities at my little brothers whilst sleeping.

      Very excited to find YOUR blog!

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  • Sarah Carter SURPRISE

    I SUPPORT YOUR MOVE TO PORTLAND CAUSE IT'S ONLY TWO HOURS FROM SEATTLE.

    Which means we would hang the heck out.

    YEEEAH!

  • Sarah Carter SURPRISE

    I SUPPORT YOUR MOVE TO PORTLAND CAUSE IT'S ONLY TWO HOURS FROM SEATTLE.

    Which means we would hang the heck out.

    YEEEAH!

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  • http://www.tanningbedbulbs.org tanning bed bulbs

    Great blog, this could be the best blog I ever visited this month. Never stop to write something useful dude!

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